Literacy Program

Clever Minds Literacy Program will use the Seeing StarsⓇ program to help students develop sensory imagery, improving word recognition, spelling and reading fluency.

The Seeing StarsⓇ program is an intensive program that helps develop and strengthen sensory imagery.  Sensory Imagery is one of the three necessary aspects of sensory-cognitive function. Sensory-cognitive function relies on: 

  • Sensory imagery is the ability to create mental representations, or pictures, for sounds and letters within words
  • Phonemic awareness is the ability to notice, think about, and work with the individual sounds in words  
  • Concept imagery is the ability to imagine the story as a whole, and not in parts (comprehension)

The Seeing StarsⓇ program focuses on the Sensory imagery aspect of reading.  

A good candidate for the Seeing StarsⓇ symbol imagery program is a student who has well-developed phonemic awareness but has difficulty with recognizing the visual patterns of letters. Encoding is using individual sounds to build and write words They may be able to sound out (decode) some words, however, they struggle with many. They may have difficulty with spelling (encoding) and reading fluency.   

Your student may have weakness in:

  • Memorizing sight words
  • Rapid word attack
  • Orthographic awareness, or being able to access the visual memory of a word, what it “looks like”.
  • Reading comprehension
  • Contextual reading fluency
  • Spelling
  • Word recognition

Some students may decode all words when reading instead of learning words by sight, resulting in reading that sounds choppy and is not fluent. Even letter shapes can be easily confused because their brains don't retain the memory of specific letter forms. They may mistake /b/ and /d/ often, or read the word 'when' as 'with' even though they read it correctly earlier in the day, because they are relying on the first 'w' to guess the word.

The English language is stocked full of irregular spelling patterns and words that “don’t play fair”.  The Seeing StarsⓇ program was created to help students to develop the brain’s ability to image, hold, and retain letter symbols in words. This approach starts with the most basic pieces of words, individual letters, and systematically strengthens the student’s orthographic processing for reading and spelling single syllable words as well as complex multi-syllable words.

Clever Minds Literacy Program Schedule:

Students will attend this program of individual instruction for 8 weeks; 1 hour/day; 2 days/week.

The first session will be a variety of symbol imagery assessments to identify your student’s strength and weaknesses.  These assessments may be familiar to the student and are not standardized tests.  They are a mix of formal and informal assessments measuring a student’s ability to remember words for spelling, work attack skills, and the ability to remember sequences of letters.  

**All students start at the beginning of the program and work their way through it, focusing on the areas of specific need.**    

Please call or email for more information about cost and to register your student. 530-582-1707     vicki@cleverminds.org

The Seeing StarsⓇ program is a research based program created by the Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes CenterⓇ, based out of San Louis Obispo, CA.  

Clever Minds is NOT Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes nor is affiliated with, certified, endorsed, licensed, monitored, or sponsored by Lindamood Bell, Nanci Bell, Phyllis Lindamood, or Pat Lindamood.  Lindamood - Bell - an international organization creating and implementing unique instructional methods and programs for quality intervention to advance language and literacy skills -  in no way endorses or monitors the services provided by Clever Minds.

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